Taking Popping Bugs In Another Direction

Discussion in 'Fly Tying' started by Ronald Braud, Apr 21, 2011.

  1.  
    Ronald Braud

    Ronald Braud Member

    A discussion on another method of painting popping bugs lead to ArticWolf asking me to post examples of my own methods with some examples.

    This is a Balsa Wood popper carved by a friend who lives in Pennsylvania and painted by me.
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    Basic colors were brushed on the top and bottom. The rest of the colors were stippled on using tools I made for myself
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    using acrylic craft paint. You just dip the working in into the paint in the cap after shaking the bottle.

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    The tools were made from different diameter needles and brass rods. The Black dashes indicate
    which needles I use and approximately where I cut off the eye and polish the resulting round end.
    Some other people, yes there actually are a few other people dabbling with this technique, use the ends of drill bits.

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    Mostly I use hard foam and cork bodies.
    The technique can be time intensive. But if you have the patience...
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    The next much smaller examples are more practical to fish. I use them to fish for sunfish such as Bluegill.
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    Thanks for looking.
  2.  
    Garhan

    Garhan Fly Fishing my love and Fly Tying my mistress.

    Just simply beautiful.
  3.  
    ArticWolf

    ArticWolf Well-Known Member

    [​IMG] holy moly...yes I had asked you to post your poppers up but ..this is as Gary just said...'Beautiful' work...and there was one that caught my eye over all the rest..the second one down from the top of the large pics..that 'black/blue' one..just Brilliant m8!
    colin Danenberger likes this.
  4.  
    Ronald Braud

    Ronald Braud Member

    Thanks!

    The Black and Turquoise popper is based on the coloration of a Rio Grande Cichlid which has become an invasive species in the New Orleans area and become the target of an annual fly fishing tournament put on by a local New Orleans Fly Fishing Club.
    colin Danenberger likes this.
  5.  
    ArticWolf

    ArticWolf Well-Known Member

    well that is one awesome colouration that's for sure!
  6.  
    andy.larkin

    andy.larkin Active Member

    My word! Those are works of art, Ronald. Beautiful patterns, not to mention how absolutely fish-worthy they look!
  7.  
    Webster

    Webster New Member

    very nicly done
  8.  
    Ronald Braud

    Ronald Braud Member

    Thanks for the kind words about my poppers.
  9.  
    shanksi

    shanksi Active Member

    Very impressive Ronald. Poppers are not used a great deal here in the UK.

    Ian
  10.  
    T.K

    T.K Well-Known Member

    They are a work of art.......Brilliant thanks for sharing......and the photography is Brilliant as well....

    Tony.......your new best friend.........:);):D:D:D
  11.  
    Ronald Braud

    Ronald Braud Member

    Ian: Poppers are not often thought of when on fishing for Salmonidae though it has happened that some have been caught on them. But for Bass and North American Saltwater fishing they are more common.

    Tony: Thanks! But you don't know how many times I had to photograph each before I came up with a presentable one. But I am slowly getting better. :) As for art, doing drawings like the one shown below is where I started working with dots. The Poppers are a less time consuming way to do something and in color. The drawing isn't much bigger than it shows up at least on my monitor. It isn't possible to do anything this fine with craft paint which I suppose is fortunate.

    [​IMG]
    Joseph Russell, T.K and rick baerg like this.
  12.  
    Wade Blevins

    Wade Blevins New Member

    Absolutely stunning work.
    As an artist myself, I am very impressed.
    Love poppers and the seahorse.
    I haven't gone to that detail yet.
    Inspires me to do more.
    Below is an image of one I did for my father called getting attention.
    It's a little fuzzy due to the picture through glass but you can still see it is all stippled.
    ~~~waders~~~

    [​IMG] Getting attention.jpg
    Joseph Russell likes this.
  13.  
    Darwin

    Darwin Well-Known Member

    Beautiful work guys! Love everything I see on this page :cool:
  14.  
    Ronald Braud

    Ronald Braud Member

    Nice drawing Wade. If you have the patience for it, stippling can be fun and is capable of a degree of shading not common to other ink methods.
  15.  
    Wade Blevins

    Wade Blevins New Member

    Ronald,
    Are you prepping the bodies with a sealant before painting, then tying in feathers, hackle and legs at the end? Using Delta ceramcoat now for final finish and like the outcome but find myself dealing with other issues with the feathers tied in at the beginning stage. I may have to build, paint and find a way to tie in feathers last. Would love to see a step by step process someday.
  16.  
    Ronald Braud

    Ronald Braud Member

    Sealing the hook in the body, sealing the body, painting the body, and clear coating
    to finish the head are all done before adding anything behind the head the way I do it.
    In that way the feathers and such can't take on paint or mar the clear coat.
  17.  
    Wade Blevins

    Wade Blevins New Member

    OK thanks. Because of the shape of the "sam's one bug", it doesn't lend well to tying in last. I have attempted clear coating carefully on several and they turned out decent. But I think the process would be much more improved and efficient if I was just working with the bodies first and tying in feathers last. Sounds like it is time for me to work on creating more of a traditional foam popper style. I need to pick up the Delta sealer/ base.
    What is the typical drying time between paints. I found Delta makes a paint that will dry in 15 minutes but heard some use hair dryers to speed up the process. Also any tips on where to find the brass rods for the eyes?
    Thanks so much.
    Wade
  18.  
    Ronald Braud

    Ronald Braud Member

    Wade:

    I generally work on painting at least ten bodies at a time. It only takes a few more minutes once the last in the line is finished before the next application of water based acrylic can be applied. The paint is shiny when wet. When there is no more shine anywhere, the next coat can be applied. fifteen minutes sounds about right. Using a hair drier can speed up the process. But sometimes cracks will appear if the paint layer is thick, such as when painting an eye.

    The brass rods I use were obtained in three foot lengths from a college book store that stocks them for architecture student projects. They are kind of pricey. But when you divide them into sections and can share the cost between a bunch of other tiers, it isn't so bad. This may not be practical for you. If you have a source that can give you some old drill bits, you may be able to get what you need at no cost other than perhaps a bit of very fine sandpaper to smooth the end you will use to paint the eyes. 3/32", 1/8", 5/32", and 3/16"(or metric equivalent) should serve for larger bodies. Smaller diameters can be used for smaller bodies. Tapestry Needles and Yarn Darners come in several diameters and are fairly inexpensive.
  19.  
    pittendrigh

    pittendrigh Active Member

    I'm beginning to think this is ONLY because nobody tries. My fishing buddy Randy owns a place on a nearby (Southwest Montana) river. One of his neighbors is a good'ol boy cattle rancher who floats the river at night--late evening anyway--and hammers extra-big brown trout with a bass rig. He uses a level wind reel and big rubber-skirted Hula Poppers. More and more local fly fishermen have been doing much the same with big but lightweight mouse patterns. So it's not too surprising the skull cracking Hula Poppers work well too.
  20.  
    Coach d

    Coach d Member

    Beautiful work. Not sure I could fish them they look so good.

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