Fly Pattern Recipe Rootbeer Chironomid

Discussion in 'Chironomids' started by Fish Finder, Mar 19, 2009.

  1.  
    Fish Finder

    Fish Finder New Member

    Rootbeer Chironomid

    [​IMG]

    Hook: #8-14 TMC Curved Nymph
    Body: Rootbeer Flashabu
    Ribbing: Small Red Wire
    Wing Case: Pheasant Tail Fibers
    Thorax: Peacock Herl
    Gills: White Ostrich
    1 3/32 Brass Bead
    RickB likes this.
  2.  
    Chauchey

    Chauchey Member

    Re: Rootbeer Chironomid

    Do you try to get a uniform color with the tail fibers on your wing cases, or if some of the fibers turn over to the lighter side of the feather 'thats ok'?
    Also, it looks as if the wing case isn't tied down. Is that correct and if so, is that because this fly is to be fished in the surface film as a still born?
    RickB likes this.
  3.  
    Fish Finder

    Fish Finder New Member

    Re: Rootbeer Chironomid

    [quote author=Chauchey link=topic=108.msg289#msg289 date=1237510288]
    Do you try to get a uniform color with the tail fibers on your wing cases, or if some of the fibers turn over to the lighter side of the feather 'thats ok'?
    Also, it looks as if the wing case isn't tied down. Is that correct and if so, is that because this fly is to be fished in the surface film as a still born?
    [/quote]

    Yes I typically fish this pattern closer to the surface of the water. In deeper water I'll use a similar patter w/ no casing. As for color of the wing case, I try to match as best as possible to the color of the thorax.

    [quote author=johnk link=topic=108.msg291#msg291 date=1237514963]
    In the spirit of keeping things accurate your pattern, though very productive in the lakes I fish, is not a Root Beer phase chironomid. From the photo it looks like it was tied with bronze flashabou #6917. the original Root Beer as Brian Chan intended it to be was a cross between rust brown and orange at that time best duplicated with FrostBite #61 Summer Duck. You can also achieve this colour by wrapping orange scudback over UTC Rust thread.




    [img width=640 height=480]http://gallery.flybc.ca/albums/johnk/DSC00142.jpg[/img]

    [img width=640 height=480]http://gallery.flybc.ca/albums/johnk/DSC00124.jpg[/img]
    [/quote]

    Very interesting information. Thank you for sharing. However I think I still call it a Rootbeer Chironomid. ::) ;)

    Finder
  4.  
    professori

    professori Member

    Re: Rootbeer Chironomid

    [quote author=johnk link=topic=108.msg291#msg291 date=1237514963]
    In the spirit of keeping things accurate your pattern, though very productive in the lakes I fish, is not a Root Beer phase chironomid. From the photo it looks like it was tied with bronze flashabou #6917. the original Root Beer as Brian Chan intended it to be was a cross between rust brown and orange at that time best duplicated with FrostBite #61 Summer Duck. You can also achieve this colour by wrapping orange scudback over UTC Rust thread.
    [/quote]

    The beauty of fly tying, in my mind, is the ability of almost any fly tier to take a pattern, be it an old classic or a relatively new one, and through subtle, or radical changes, make it his/her own. When I am tying up a pattern that another tier has originated, and I am following their recipe as closely as I can, I will give the other tier full credit. When I personalize the fly to a greater extent, I will call it whatever seems to fit. I currently tie a very nice chironomid that I call the Golden Wonder. It certainly was inspired by another fly, the Wonderbug, but I have changed it far enough from the original to feel free to name it as I will. It would seem to me, that Finder's pattern has little or no connection to Chan's (other than a similar color), and see no reason to tell him it isn't a root beer chironomid. It is his pattern, he can call it whatever seems fit to him. Had he called it a Brian Chan Root Beer, or the original root beer, or some such , there might be grounds to quibble, but not here I think. Until we start seeing names and patterns copyrited, I think we should be able to tie, name and share the many variations on a theme that make up this wonderful folk art form, without nitpicking each other for those deviations from the originals.

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